Herbs and CBD Oil for Anxiety

Herbs and CBD Oil for Anxiety

The Use of CBD Oil for Anxiety

CBD Oil for Anxiety

The demanding realities of the 21st century have contributed to an increase in anxiety and stress that we must cope with on a daily basis. A new study finds that 4.3 million Americans with full-time jobs had an anxiety disorder in the past year. Mood and anxiety disorders pose significant health burdens on the community and the current medications used to treat anxiety have many limitations. Fortunately CBD Oil for anxiety is now available!

Recent medical and scientific studies provide overwhelming evidence supporting the effectiveness of CBD Oil for anxiety treatment. CBD has been proven to affect specialized areas of the brain which reduce anxiety and stress while also promoting relaxation. The amazing thing is that CBD Oil for anxiety has shown to be as effective as traditional anxiety medications, without any of the negative side-effects (Pedersen, 2015).

Is CBD Oil for Anxiety safe and effective enough to replace current medications?

CBD Hemp Oil is being extensively studied and promoted for its broad therapeutic properties and for its ability to relieve various anxiety-related conditions. CBD Hemp Oil is a safe supplement that can be used by people suffering from generalized anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder and schizophrenia.

Several studies and experiments have consistently demonstrated the effects of CBD on different areas of the brain and how it positively affects mood, fear, anxiety and behaviors (Blessing et al., 2015).

How does CBD Oil relieve anxiety?

Several studies have shown that CBD positively affects certain areas of the brain associated with fear and anxiety, such as the amygdala and hypothalamus (Crippa et al., 2004). The use of CBD Oil for anxiety in these studies showed reduced anxiety in the test group when compared to the placebo group. Participants’ heart rates and blood pressure were lower, perceived anxiety was rated lower by participants, and mood was improved (Fusar-Poli et al., 2009). In addition, participants’ fear response weakened, slight sedative effects were shown, and activity in the amygdala and hypothalamus were recorded as being lower.

In studies with schizophrenic patients, symptoms such as social withdrawal, decreased pleasure, and lack of motivation greatly improved with the introduction of CBD (Fakhoury, 2016). In fact, the results were better in patients given CBD for anxiety than in patients using traditional antipsychotic drugs – with the added benefit of no unpleasant side-effects that are typically associated with pharmaceutical treatments.

Why is CBD oil preferred over pharmaceutical medication?

Traditional anti-psychotic and anxiety medications, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (clozapine, diazepam, ipsapirone, etc.) have been proven to have negative side-effects which sometimes result in discontinued usage (Blessing et al., 2015). Common side-effects include problems with movement, weight gain, decreased pleasure, lack of motivation, and digestive troubles (Pedersen, 2015).

Studies have shown that CBD is as effective as pharmaceutical medications for treating anxiety, without the negative side-effects. CBD Hemp Oil does not affect cognition, it has good tolerability, and is safe for long-term use (Schier et al., 2012).

CBD Hemp Oil is developing an increased interest for its broad therapeutic properties and its potential as a treatment for anxiety-related conditions. With the downfalls and limitations of current pharmaceutical drugs for the treatment of anxiety, natural herbs taken in conjunction with CBD Hemp Oil are providing promising, effective alternatives.

 

What other natural supplements can help treat anxiety?

Here are five natural herbs that can help ease anxiety when taken in conjunction with CBD Hemp Oil.

 

  • Chamomile is a popular herb, well-known for its anxiolytic and calming effects. It helps to ease an upset stomach due to stress, calm the nerves and promote relaxation. Chamomile flowers can be infused in tea for a medicinal tonic.

 

  • Passionflower helps to ease anxiety, insomnia, seizures, and hysteria. Scientists believe passionflower works by increasing levels of a chemical called GABA in the brain, which decreases the activity of some brain cells, promoting relaxation.

 

  • L-Theanine is a constituent found in black tea and can be purchased as a powder in concentrated form. L-Theanine helps reduce the physical reaction to stress and it has received attention for its anxiety-relieving effects. It helps     reduce heart rate related to stress and weakens the fight-or-flight response in stressful situations (Johnson, 2007).

 

  •  St. John’s Wort is one of the  most commonly used herbal medicines in the treatment of anxiety and  depressive disorders (Sarris & Kavanagh, 2009). St. John’s Wort has effects similar to an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake     inhibitor), increasing the brain chemicals serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine which help improve mood (Ehrlich, 2014).

 

  •  Ashwagandha helps your body adapt to stress. It acts on lowering the stress hormone, cortisol, in the body, consequently allowing patients to feel less stressed, less anxious and more relaxed.

 

References

 

Almeida, V. et al. (2013). Cannabidiol exhibits anxiolytic but not antipsychotic property

evaluated in the social interaction test. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 41(5), 30-35. Retrieved from

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0278584612002801

 

Anxiety and Depression Association of America. (2016). Facts and Statistics. Retrieved from

https://www.adaa.org/about…/facts-statistics

 

Blessing, E.M. et al. (2015). Cannabidiol as a Potential Treatment for Anxiety

Disorders. Neurotherapeutics, 12(4), 825-836. Retrieved from

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4604171/

 

Crippa, J.A. et al. (2004). Effects of Cannabidiol (CBD) on Regional Cerebral Blood

Flow. Neuropsychopharmacology. 29, 417–426. Retrieved from

http://www.nature.com/npp/journal/v29/n2/full/1300340a.html

 

Ehrlich, S. (2014). St. John’s wort. University of Maryland Medical Center.

Retrieved from

http://www.umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/st-johns-wort

 

Fakhoury, M. (2016). Could cannabidiol be used as an alternative to antipsychotics?

Journal of Psychiatric Research. 80, 14-21. Retrieved from

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27267317

 

Fusar-Poli, P. et al. (2009). Distinct Effects of Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and

Cannabidiol on Neural Activation During Emotional Processing. Arch Gen Psychiatry, 66(1), 95-105. Retrieved from

http://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/482939

 

Johnson, T. (2007). Quick Relief from Anxiety and Stress Without Tranquilizer Drugs.

Life Extension Magazine. Retrieved from

http://www.lifeextension.com/magazine/2007/8/report_stress_anxiety/page-02

 

Pedersen, T. (2015). Marijuana Compound May Beat Antipsychotics at Treating

Schizophrenia. Psych Central. Retrieved from

https://psychcentral.com/news/2012/06/07/marijuana-compound-may-beat-antipsychotics-at-treating-schizophrenia/39803.html

 

Schier, A.F. et al. (2012). Cannabidiol, a Cannabis sativa constituent, as an anxiolytic

drug. Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria, 34. Retrieved from

http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1516-44462012000500008

 

Soares, V.P & Campos, A.C. (2013). Evidences for the Anti-panic Actions of

Cannabidiol. Curr Neuropharmacol. 15(2), 291-299. Retrieved from

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27157263

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